Michael Rubin Discusses ASME Standards and Crane Safety in Construction Equipment Guide
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Michael Rubin Discusses ASME Standards and Crane Safety in Construction Equipment Guide

June 16, 2021

Michael Rubin, chair of Goldberg Segalla’s national OSHA and Worksite Safety group, discusses how businesses operating in the crane industry can enhance their safety performance by following directives set forth in the ASME B30 standards in an article for Construction Equipment Guide.

In “Crane Safety by the Numbers—Lifting Projects Dictated by OSHA Rules, ASME Standards,” Michael identifies the ASME as a leading international developer of codes and standards for mechanical engineering, including—since 1924—the crane industry.

“OSHA’s standards set the bar for the minimum in safety,” Michael said. “When it comes to safety, the general consensus is that a comprehensive health and safety system is needed—complete with management commitment, employee participation, worksite analysis, hazard prevention and control and training—all with a focus on continuous improvement.”

However, he pointed out, there is something more basic and immediately accessible that could help.

“Anyone operating in the crane industry—including crane rental companies and contractors—will immediately enhance their safety performance by following the guidance and directives set forth in the ASME B30 standards.”

READ THE FULL ARTICLE:

Crane Safety by the Numbers—Lifting Projects Dictated by OSHA Rules, ASME Standards,” Construction Equipment Guide, June 14, 2021

MORE ABOUT GOLDBERG SEGALLA’S MICHAEL RUBIN:

A Certified Safety Professional (CSP), Michael Rubin focuses his practice on issues involving occupational safety and health law. He advises and represents employers across multiple industries and around the country in connection with OSHA inspections, investigations, and enforcement actions. He also develops and audits safety programs and policies, and counsels employers on related risk-management strategies. He has hands-on experience managing accident investigations—including those involving multiple fatalities—and regularly represents employers before, during, and after the OSHA inspection process.